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Northeastern University

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Northeastern University is a private university in Boston. Its athletic mascot is the Husky.

It is located on 360 Huntington Avenue, also known as Avenue of the Arts, and is accessible by the T through the Green (Northeastern and Symphony stops) and Orange (Massachusetts Avenue and Ruggles stops) Lines.

In Northeastern University, a typical degree program may take five years (rather than the more common four) because of its Co-op program. The Co-op program enables a student to use entire semesters for participating in an internship-type experience that is often paid employment, relates to the student's field of study, and ties back into the university's programs for evaluation of acquired experience. Most of the school's undergraduate students take part in this program.

History Edit

Northeastern began in 1898 as an "Evening Institute for Younger Men" hosted at the Huntington Avenue YMCA, and catered to the large immigrant population of Boston. Within a few years of its formation, it offered classes in a diverse spectrum of subjects ranging from law to engineering to finance. In 1909 the school began offering day classes and it moved to a new location on Huntington Avenue in 1913. The new location grew further with the purchase of the Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (former Boston Red Sox ballpark) in 1929, but was unable to build on the land due to the Great Depression. The school was officially organized as a college in 1916, and in 1922 it was renamed to "Northeastern University of the Boston Young Men's Christian Association."

In 1935, the College of Liberal Arts was added to Northeastern, and the name was changed to simply "Northeastern University." In 1937 The Northeastern University Corporation was established, creating a board of trustees made up of 31 members of the NU Corporation and 8 members of the YMCA. In 1948 Northeastern separated itself completely from the YMCA.

Following World War II, Northeastern began admitting women, and in the boom of post-war college-bound students, Northeastern created a College of Education (1953), University College (now called the School of Continuing and Professional Studies) (1960), College of Pharmacy and College of Nursing, which were then combined into the Bouvé College (1964), College of Criminal Justice (1967) and College of Computer Science (1982).

In addition to expanding academics, Northeastern began building large numbers of residence halls in the early 1990s, some of which have been frowned upon by the community.

In 1999, Northeastern submitted a Master Plan to the city of Boston, outlining its 10-year goals for expanding the campus, namely, moving from a commuter school to a residential school.

Campus Design and LocationEdit

The college sports a well-traveled network of underground tunnels connecting major campus buildings for easier travel during inclement or winter weather. It is also unique for its sprawling growth integrated into a dense commercial area, with two four-lane city thoroughfares and a pair of street-level light rail tracks (plus an elevated light rail bridge) running through the campus. The school and its residences occupy a considerable swath of land between the upper-middle-class neighborhood of the Back Bay Fens and the urban working class neighborhood of Roxbury. This has led to a uniquely challenging level of interaction and concession with diverse local urban communities.


PresidentsEdit

Presidents of Northeastern (with years of tenure and campus buildings named in their honor):


AcademicsEdit

Colleges and SchoolsEdit

Majors and ConcentrationsEdit

  • African-American Studies
  • American Sign Language
  • Applied Physics
  • Architecture
  • Athletic Training
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Biomedical Physics
  • Business Administration
    • Concentration in Accounting
    • Concentration in Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management
    • Concentration in Finance and Insurance
    • Concentration in Human Resources Management
    • Concentration in Management
    • Concentration in Management Information Systems
    • Concentration in Marketing
    • Concentration in Supply-Chain Management
  • Cardiopulmonary and Exercise Sciences
    • Concentration in Exercise Physiology
    • Concentration in Respiratory Therapy
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Clinical Exercise Psychology
  • Communication Studies
    • Concentration in Media Studies
    • Concentration in Public Communication
    • Concentration in Mass Communication
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Engineering Technology
  • Computer Science
  • Criminal Justice
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • English
  • Environmental Geology
  • Environmental Studies
  • French
  • Geology
  • Graphic Design
  • Health Science
  • History
    • Concentration in Public History
  • Human Services
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Information Science
  • International Affairs
  • International Business
    • Concentration in Accounting
    • Concentration in Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management
    • Concentration in Finance and Insurance
    • Concentration in Human Resources Management
    • Concentration in Management
    • Concentration in Management Information Systems
    • Concentration in Marketing
    • Concentration in Supply-Chain Management
  • Linguistics
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Medical Laboratory Science
  • Multimedia Studies
    • Concentration in Animation
    • Concentration in Graphic Design
    • Concentration in Music Technology
    • Concentration in Photography
  • Music
    • Concentration in Literature
    • Concentration in Literature and Performance
    • Concentration in Music Industry
    • Concentration in Music Technology
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacy
  • Philosophy
    • Concentration in Law and Ethics
    • Concentration in Religious Studies
  • Physical Therapy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
    • Concentration in International and Comparitive Politics
    • Concentration in Law and Legal Issues
    • Concentration in Public Policy and Administration
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
  • Theatre
    • Concentration in Performance
    • Concentration in Production
  • Visual Arts
    • Concentration in Animation
    • Concentration in Photography

Dual MajorsEdit

Dual Majors are programs between departments and colleges that eliminate some of the more redundant course requirements and still allows the student to major in two subjects. Dual Majors are different from Double Majors in that some of the major requirements are waived.

  • Computer Science and Cognative Psychology
  • Computer Science and Mathematics
  • Computer Science and Physics
  • Cinema Studies and Communication Studies
  • Cinema Studies and English
  • Cinema Studies and Journalism
  • Cinema Studies and Modern Languages
  • Cinema Studies and Theatre
  • Linguistics and English
  • Linguistics and Psychology
  • American Sign Language and Psychology
  • American Sign Language and Human Services
  • American Sign Language and Theatre

Additional "informal" dual major programs may exist where there is an agreement within departments to waive some of the requirements for double majors (such as Business Administration and Economics).

MinorsEdit

  • African-American Studies
  • Animation
  • Architectural History
  • Art
  • Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Cinema Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Engineering Technology
  • Computer Science
  • Criminal Justice
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • East Asian Studies
  • Economics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Elementary Education
  • English Literature
  • English Writing
  • Environmental Geology
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Studies
  • Ethnomusicology
  • French
  • Geology
  • Graphic Design
  • Hematology
  • History
  • Human Services
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Information Science
  • International Affairs
  • Immunohematology
  • Immunology
  • Jewish Studies
  • Journalism
  • Latino, Latin American, and Caribbean Studies
  • Leadership Studies
  • Marine Biology
  • Marine Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Medical Laboratory Chemistry
  • Microbiology
  • Middle East Studies
  • Music
  • Music Industry
  • Music Theatre
  • Philosophy
  • Photography
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Secondary Education
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Technical Communication
  • Technological Entrepreneurship
  • Theatre
  • Toxicology
  • Urban Studies
  • Women's Studies

Notable alumniEdit

Notable facultyEdit

External linksEdit

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